Working Culture

Understanding and adjusting to the Danish working culture can sometimes present challenges to foreigners. There are certain unwritten rules you need to know.

Working Culture in Denmark

While some elements of the Danish working culture are easy to adjust to, others may seem like more of a mystery or even completely unfathomable.

Work-life balance

Work-life balance is highly valued by employees, and employers respect that. A standard Danish working week consists of 37 hours usually carried out from Monday to Friday. In addition, most employees have a certain degree of flexibility, which allow them to work when it fits them or even work from home. Thus, overtime is rare and generally avoided. However, it is very important that you meet your deadlines and show up on time at meetings.

Flat hierarchy

Hierarchies are generally rather flat in Danish workplaces, which can sometimes confuse foreigners, who may be used to a more strict hierarchy. Not that there is no structure within a Danish organization, but it is generally much flatter in reality and with more discussion and consensus, rather than giving and receiving of orders.

The general atmosphere in a Danish workplace is professional but also casual and informal. Danes are on first name basis with all their colleagues and even their superiors.

Personal and professional development

Another difference can be the attention that is paid to employees' welfare and personal growth within companies. There are many opportunities to improve your qualifications within Danish organizations, should you desire to do so. This also means that managers pay closer attention to ensuring that their colleagues are content and find meaning in their tasks.

Social activities in the workplace

Danish people are often involved in social activities at work. Most companies have a some social events throughout the year to which everyone is invited, for example, Christmas parties, summer outings, cake on Fridays, etc., and almost everyone participates in these events.